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Sexploitation

The Sexploitation podcast decodes sexual harms and provides you with active solutions. We address the full spectrum of sexual exploitation, from sex trafficking to sexual violence, to rape culture, to pornography, and more. And better yet, we give you the tools to make a difference!
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Now displaying: 2017
Jun 2, 2017

Dr. Sharon Cooper is a developmental and forensic pediatrician who evaluates and treats children who have been victims of all forms of abuse, though her primary area of expertise is that of sexual exploitation. 

At an event held by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation in the U.S. Capitol, Dr. Cooper shared 3 ways adult pornography is harming children:

1) Adult use of adult pornography in child abuse

2) Adult pornography's influence on child-on-child sexual abuse

3) Exposure to adult pornography harms children's development

Resources:

Learn more about other presentations that were given at the same event here: http://endsexualexploitation.org/briefing/

Find resources for protecting children from pornography, and for recovering from pornography addiction, here: http://endsexualexploitation.org/resources/

May 25, 2017

Whether you are a college student, know a college student, or just care about fighting sexual exploitation in ANY environment, this episode is filled with practical action steps to get you started.

College students should be safe from sexual assault, and the factors that contribute to campus sexual assault must be recognized. 

Campus sexual assault is often tied to issues like sporting events, sex week events, fraternities, pornography use, drinking, and more. Tune-in to this episode to understand the issue, and to learn simple actions you can take to combat the factors that contribute to sexual exploitation on college campuses.

Call to Action:

Learn more at: endsexualexploitation.org/college

Tips to address Sex Week on college campuses: endsexualexploitation.org/sexweek

Resource Center: endsexualexploitation.org/resources

Other educational resources:

endsexualexploitation.org/publichealth

endsexualexploitation.org/prostitution

endsexualexploitation.org/sextrafficking

May 5, 2017

Special guest Josh McDowell, an author, apologist, and founder of Josh McDowell Ministry, joins this podcast episode to address the current climate in the church regarding pornography.

He provides advice for individuals, pastors, and churches about recovery from pornography. He weighs in on the debate about if church leaders should be fired when they confess an addiction to pornography.

McDowell also addresses the positive efforts going on in diverse faith communities to address the harms of pornography.

Call to Action:

To learn more about Josh McDowell and his ministries visit: www.josh.org

To join NCOSE's interfaith prayer team visit: endsexualexploitation.org/prayer

Apr 28, 2017

Evidence supports the fact that child sexual abuse, prostitution, pornography, sex trafficking, sexual violence, etc., are not isolated phenomena occurring in a vacuum. Rather, these and other forms of sexual abuse and exploitation overlap and reinforce one another.

Accordingly, the National Center on Sexual Exploitation has developed The Freedom From Sexploitation Agenda to present Congress and the executive branch with robust critical recommendations that powerfully combat sexual exploitation, protect human rights, and preserve human dignity.


Dawn Hawkins addressed these themes in the U.S. Capitol for an event held by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation regarding The Freedom from Sexploitation Agenda. 

Call To Action:

To learn more about the Freedom From Sexploitation Agenda and to watch videos of other presentations given in the U.S. Capitol visit: sexploitationfreedomagenda.com.

Apr 13, 2017

Child sexual abuse is perhaps one of the most heinous crimes imaginable.

As a result, people often avoid thinking or talking about it. But pushing such a serious problem under the rug might be doing more harm than good.

Research conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that approximately 1 in 6 boys and 1 in 4 girls are sexually abused before the age of 18. So parents and concerned adults everywhere are wondering, "what can we do?"

This podcast will outline four conversations you could have with a child to help guard against sexual abuse:

  1. No means no, and nobody is allowed to touch you in a way that makes you feel uncomfortable or scared.
  2. Name the body parts.
  3. Sometimes people we think are good guys, act like bad guys.
  4. You can always talk to me, even if you feel embarrassed or scared.

In addition to having these active conversations with the kids in your life, you can help guard against child sexual abuse by keeping alert to the signs of abuse, which are listed in this podcast episode.

Call to Action:

Use the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children's free downloadable resource to explain “The Underwear Rule.”

Check out StopItNow's Tip Sheet for signs of abuse.

Read RAINN's guidelines for how to talk to a child when you suspect abuse.

 

Apr 6, 2017

Special guest Dr. John Foubert addresses an innovative program on college campuses.

Dr. John Foubert is the national president of One in Four, professor at Oklahoma State University author of several books including most recently How Pornography Harms.

One In Four is a national nonprofit dedicated to sexual assault prevention, focusing on college campuses and military bases. This organization conducts prevention presentations to teach men and women alike about the harms of rape. Research shows that these programs lead to a 40% decline in sexual assault behavior by male participants, and that it increases bystander intervention among women.

Dr. Foubert explains the success of this program, and some of the root influences that make such preventative programs necessary to combat false beliefs about rape and sexual assault.

Call to Action:

Read Dr. Foubert's Book: How Pornography Harms

Connect with One in Four: OneInFourUSA.org

Learn more: www.johnfoubert.com

Mar 23, 2017

Special guest, Dr. Gail Dines analyzes the big business behind porn.

Dr. Gail Dines is a professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies at Wheelock College, where she is also chair of the American Studies department. Having researched and written about the porn industry for over twenty years, Dr. Dines is internationally acclaimed as the leading expert on how pornography shapes our identities, culture, and sexuality. She is a consultant to government agencies in the US and abroad, including the UK, Norway, Iceland, and Canada.

While popular Internet pornography today seems like it is being mass produced by thousands of companies, the reality is that there is a porn monopoly. Could this be good news?

Dr. Dines provides key insights into the corporate infrastructure behind pornography, and what might happen if the largest porn company in the world got shut down.

Call to Action:

Visit Culture Reframed: www.culturereframed.org

Read Dr. Dines' book: Pornland: How Porn Had Hijacked Our Sexuality

 

Mar 10, 2017

We live in an age where many consumers demand transparency from companies they trust. We want to know the working conditions of those who made our clothing, and if pesticides were used to grow our food.

Now, thanks to The Dirty Dozen List, we can see which well-known entities promote and profit from forms of sexual exploitation. 

No corporation should profit from or facilitate sexual exploitation.

Unfortunately, many well-established brands, companies, and organizations in America do just that. Since 2013, the National Center on Sexual Exploitation has published an annual Dirty Dozen List to name and shame the bad corporate actors in America that perpetuate sexual exploitation—whether that be through pornography, prostitution, and sex trafficking.

The Dirty Dozen List is an activism tool that has instigated tremendous changes, leading to policy improvements at Google, Hilton Worldwide, Verizon, Walmart, and the Department of Defense.

This episode gives you a behind-the-scene look at the origin and accomplishments of the Dirty Dozen List.

Call to Action:

Learn more at dirtydozenlist.com.

Positive Thank You Action: Thank Apple TV for Keeping Pornography Off Its App Store and Apple TV

Email Action: Tell Comcast to Stop Selling Sexually Exploitive Content

Mar 3, 2017

Online library databases in many schools are piping pornographic and sexually explicit materials into children's lives.

We were shocked when we discovered EBSCO, and other similar companies, that provide academic resources for grades K-12 are not filtering out sexually explicit content. Even innocent searches return results like links to hardcore pornography websites, stories normalizing student-teacher sexual relationships, and articles encouraging group, public, and anal sex.

This is one of the largest scandals we've ever discussed, and it's something parents and teachers alike need to know.

Tune-in to learn more. 

Call to Action:

Listen to our past episode #10 about filtering in public libraries: http://bit.ly/2m35tYY

Learn more and take action here: endsexualexploitation.org/ebsco

 

Feb 24, 2017

The unspoken truth is that Sports Illustrated’s Swimsuit Issue is not a triumph of female athleticism, agency, or empowerment. Instead, it is a descent into sexual objectification.

Research sows that when someone is being objectified the objectifier is viewing them as if they do not possess a real, individual mind and as if they are less deserving of moral treatment.[1] Some claim that these experiences are “likely to contribute to mental health problems that disproportionately affect women (i.e., eating disorders, depression, and sexual dysfunction.)" [2]

Objectification also impacts men, as shown by the fact that sexual objectification occurs in 37% of advertisements featuring men's body parts to showcase a product.[3]

But why is it that so many people actively participate in objectification culture? This podcast will discuss the phenomenon of self-objectification, and why it is ultimately not empowering.

CALL TO ACTION:

Email Barnes & Noble executives to ask them to remove Playboy magazine from their shelves.

 

Citations:

[1] http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ejsp.755/full

[2] https://books.apa.org/education/ce/sexual-objectification.pdf

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23458607

Feb 13, 2017

The London Abused Women’s Centre, Canada; Collective Shout, Australia; Culture Reframed, USA; and The National Center on Sexual Exploitation (NCOSE), USA have partnered to raise awareness that Fifty Shades of Grey - and it's latest film installment Fifty Shades Darker - normalizes domestic violence.

The Fifty Shades trilogy follows wealthy and powerful businessman Christian Grey as he meets Anastasia Steele, a virginal college student lacking confidence, and woos her into his BDSM (sexual sadism or torture sex) world and “red room of pain.”

The relationship maps onto what would be considered an abusive relationship rife domestic violence in the real world. Christian puts Ana under contract to serve as a sexual “submissive” and uses intimidation, coercion, humiliation, violence, stalking, manipulation, jealousy and other controlling behaviors to groom Ana and keep her under his domination. Ana is consistently isolated, threatened, and manipulated, yet she comes back to Christian time and time again because she thinks her love can change him. As the story progresses, Ana, who was first fearful and disturbed by Christian’s controlling behaviors and dark sexual practices, gradually becomes desensitized to his harsh treatment. These are hallmarks of abusive relationships.

You can read examples of domestic abuse in the Fifty Shades book here.

The mainstreaming of this book also sends the message to women that they can “fix” violent, controlling men by being obedient and loving.

Call to Action:

1) Sign this pledge to boycott the film.

2) Donate to a women's shelter instead of visiting the film through DomesticShelters.org.

3) Share graphics and learn more at FiftyShadesIsAbuse.com.

 

Feb 3, 2017

An Alabama child advocacy group called Palmer Place recently reported an increase in child-on-child sex abuse cases, and they believe it was brought on by a growing addiction to pornography among children.

How can we better understand the phenomenon of children who sexually abuse other children, and how can we intervene?

One 2015 study by Dr. Cathy Humphreys, and others, explored this question by sampling a broad range of research and literature on the issue.

 In this study—published in the Health & Social Care in the Community Journal—they identified a few key areas that are vital to understand on this topic, and today we’ll cover the Characteristics, the Causes, and the preventative Communications.

1) Characteristics

A 2009 national survey analyzed data from 13,471 cases of sexually abusive behavior. They found that there was an escalation in sexual abuse offending at the age of 12 years.

Case records of 700 young abusers in the United Kingdom found that 38% had intellectual difficulties. A 2013 study found that 97% of minors who’ve sexually abused other minors were male. 

When it comes to pornography use, a 2011 longitudinal study of 1,588 US households found that minors who intentionally watched violent pornography over time predicted a six-fold increase in the odds of self-reported sexually abusive behavior for both boys and girls.

2) Causes

A (2000) life history analysis of two boys who sexually abused children showed trends of hegemonic masculinity.

Unfortunately, another reason some people may abuse others is because they themselves experienced sexual abuse. 

A 2012 longitudinal study examined 2,759 records of children who had been sexually abused between 1964 and 1995. They found that 5% of male victims were later convicted of a sexual offense compared to 0.6% of males in the general population.

3) Communication

Sexual abuse prevention education is found in intentional teaching sessions to raise children’s awareness about sexual abuse, and to provide them with tools for how to respond if abused.

There are two major sites for this kind of education: school–child communication and parent–child communication.

 

TAKE ACTION:

First, can talk to your local school and inquire what prevention strategies they have for both on school grounds and if they use any curriculum to try and prevention child abuse.

Second, talk with the children in your life about. 6 year olds, and those younger, can benefit from simple conversations about how “no mean no” and to come speak to a trusted adult if anyone ever hurts them or makes them feel uncomfortable. Also, it’s important to speak to all children about the harms of pornography, and to create a trusting environment where they can express their questions about sexuality or what they might have seen in pornography.

Jan 19, 2017

America is suffering from a sexual exploitation crisis. Sex trafficking, pornography addiction, sexual assault, child sexual abuse, and more, are issues significantly impacting American citizens, families, and communities.  This necessitates that the full spectrum of sexual harm must be addressed by our federal government.

NCOSE is located in Washington DC in order to elevate the platform of these issues on that national level. We’re a nonpartisan nonprofit but that doesn’t stop us from advocating for freedom from sexual exploitation in any administration and at any opportunity. 

So NCOSE recently sent a letter to the incoming Trump Administration prioritize specific policy actions regarding sex trafficking, the public health crisis of pornography, and more. Dawn Hawkins, the NCOSE Executive Director, explains these priorities in this episode.

Call to Action:

If you are ever in DC and want to set up a meeting with your elected representative to discuss these issues, contact us at public@ncose.com. We will be happy to attend and support you in that meeting, and to make sure your voice is heard.

Also, please subscribe and please rate and review! We would love 5 stars. 

Here are instructions for how to rate and review a podcast on your iPhone or iPad:

http://www.imore.com/how-rate-or-review-podcast-your-iphone-or-ipad

Jan 6, 2017

Earlier this year, ESPLERP (Erotic Service Providers Legal, Education and Research Project) filed suit in San Francisco District Court claiming that the state’s prostitution laws were unconstitutional. The District Court rightly rejected ESPLERP’s claims.

Now ESPLERP is appealing the decision.

Savanah Lawrence, NCOSE's Legal Fellow, shares about the amicus brief NCOSE submitted to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of ESPLERP v. Gascón, urging the court to recognize the harms of prostitution.

Because prostitution is inherently dehumanizing and harmful it is vital for the Ninth Circuit to uphold the lower court’s decision.

Studies characterize the violence that animates prostitution as brutal, extreme, common, stunning, normative, and ever-present. Indeed, physical and sexual violence across prostitution types is pervasive, whether one is prostituting in Chennai or Chicago, indoors or outdoors, for drugs or to pay the rent, on a street corner, in a car, back alley, brothel, massage parlor, or strip club. Both the threat of, as well as actual physical and sexual violence, permeate prostitution. Most of this violence is perpetrated by sex buyers and pimps.

Decriminalizing prostitution does not change this reality—it assents to it.

CALL TO ACTION:

Learn more about the harms of prostitution here: http://endsexualexploitation.org/prostitution

Free download booklet on violence in prostitution: http://bit.ly/2h04qb9

Jan 3, 2017

Before we can begin to address “how” to talk to kids about pornography, it’s important to understand “when” that conversation becomes relevant.

Many parents might assume that a few years after puberty is the time to have this talk. However, in today's digital culture, studies show that many children are being exposed to pornography before puberty.

“The talk” is no longer applicable in today’s world. Dawn Hawkins, Executive Director of NCOSE and mother of two, shares how parents need to establish open dialogues in our homes about sexuality and media.

Dawn shares that the best time to start talking to your child about these issues is right now. She discusses how this conversation looks for young children and teens alike.

CALL TO ACTION:

Check out our Resource Center for parents: http://endsexualexploitation.org/resources-parents/

Read this blog with some conversational tips: http://endsexualexploitation.org/articles/why-vs-what-talking-to-kids-about-pornography/

Have a conversation with your kids this week about pornography and email public@ncose.com to tell us about it. We want to hear from you.

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